Happy Birthday, Mac

In the Hutong
Geeking out and Maccing off
1637 hrs.

I don’t know about you all, but when I was using Windows I seemed to go through a laptop about every 18 months to two years. Somehow, in that period of time, normal wear-and-tear would render the things unstable, slow, and eventually unusable.

My first Windows laptop was an NEC. I bought the thing in November of 1996, and it lasted me until May of 1998. 18 months.

My second Windows laptop was an Acer. That one did pretty good – it lasted me from May of 1988 until July of 2000 before croaking. 26 months.

My third Windows laptop was a second-hand Dell, company issued. That one lasted me from August 2000 to April 2001. 9 months. It was old, anyway.

My fourth Windows laptop was another Dell, also company issued. That lasted from April 2001 until I replaced it 15 months later with my Fujitsu Lifebook D.

The Fujitsu Lifebook D I actually picked up as a second computer so I could have something that was my own. I got it in August 2001. It lasted until February 2003 – 17 months and then completely croaked, leaving me having to borrow a laptop.

The Return of Mac

In April 2003, after an absence of nearly 7 years, I returned to Mac, buying a 17″ PowerBook as soon as Apple in China got its first shipment. In fact, I can confidently say it was the first of its kind outside of Apple in Northern China.

Last year, I bought a new 17″ MacBookPro, expecting the PowerBook to croak.

It’s still going. And I still use it daily alongside the MacBookPro.

Today, it’s been 4 years since I bought the PowerBook, and it’s still running happily. A freaking record.

Oh, and my wife’s iBook has 3-1/2 years on it. That’s a record, too.

Of course, I know that the life of a computer is determined by many things, and so I won’t claim some kind if innate superiority for Macintosh. Your results may vary. Suffice to say that we’ve got 6 Macs in our business and we’ll be buying 2 more in the next year – not as replacements, but as additions.

Four years on a laptop?

Damn.