Cross-Post: Rethinking How to Win Hearts and Minds

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In the Hutong
Thinking about my phone
1445 hrs.

In my day job as a corporate communications strategist, I work with companies who want other people to think good things about them and their products. As a rule, the companies who find that easy do not seek me out, so I wind up working with companies who are having a hard time connecting with the people they need to make them successful.

Anyone who has tried it will tell you that communications is easy, but influence is hard, and the Internet, cultural differences, and the psychic baggage of globalization challenge the best of us. We learn a lot from experience, but we are always hungry for ideas that will help us not only improve our results, but also make the process itself more transparent and eliminate spin and disinformation from the corporate playbook.

One of the places to which I occasionally turn for inspiration about what to do – or what not to do – is the growing mass of literature on what is euphemistically called “information operations,” including psychological operations. I reviewed a fascinating work from the RAND Corporation for my other blog, The Peking Review, and I share it (with some additions) below.

PsyOps is Dead

The theory and practice of military psychological operations find their roots in World War II, and for decades remained largely unchanged. There was good reason for this: the media via which psychological operations were conducted were largely of a broadcast type. Aside from the advent of television, psychological operations were conducted with media that existed since the early 20th Century.

Now that the Internet has become all but pervasive, and mass media have begun to change, the military is being forced to take a step back from the channels of its communications and start to explore the nature of influence before trying to decide how to exert that influence. The result of that overdue introspection is Foundations of Effective Influence Operations.

I am a communicator by profession, and in the fraught, complex, and often dirty world of business in Asia I face challenges that bear notable similarities to those facing Army PsyOps people on the battlefield. As such, I was interested to see what a team of seven really bright RAND scholars had to say.

Actions First, Communications Later

The result was both surprising and delightful. Surprising, because the book is so good that it could serve as a capstone or entry-level introduction for anyone studying communications or marketing; delightful, because I found so many of my own conclusions echoed in its pages. My favorite passage:

Put simply, because what we actually do often matters far more than what we say, influence operations frequently will focus on explain- ing and leveraging off tangible actions by casting them in a positive context and thereby building trust with an audience or by countering adversary claims about such actions with factual information that is buttressed by facts on the ground and averred by local opinion leaders whose credibility and trustworthiness is judged to be high.

The other conclusion that hit home with me was that there are no easy formulas that will translate across different situations, much less across cultures, and that artful improvisation in the development of communications campaigns was essential. I’ve long believed that great communications is not a template, and to have that affirmed in this study was edifying indeed.

These glimpses only scratch the surface. The book also surveys the full range of communications theory, offers pointers to further reading, and elegantly addresses the question of online influence. There is great depth and much insight in this book that can only be appreciated by reading it.