“A” Buildings and “B” Management

Or, Top 10 Signs that Your Building Management Has Been Localized

Hutong West
Nursing the Party Secretary
1136 hrs.

A good friend and client of mine set up offices about two years ago in one of Shanghai’s better office buildings. The building housed some top professional services firms, including a cluster of subsidiaries of one of the world’s largest marketing services conglomerates. The building has been a prestige address, and is close to some funky local neighborhoods and two of my favorite hotels in the city.

Unfortunately, according to my friend, the owners of the building apparently decided to drop the global firm managing the property, choosing instead a local management company. Not long after, things began to get noticeably, well, grottier.

As our conversation progressed, I began to think about similar situations I’ve encountered with local building managers in China, and in the process I came up with this list of the top ten signs that your building management has been localized.

I post this as a public service, both for companies who are seeing the quality slip in their buildings, and as an encouragement to local management firms to up their game.

Sidebar: It is important to note that not all Chinese management companies are cut from the same cloth. Top Glory and its subsidiary Gloria Property Management (owned by the state-owned COFCO Group) in particular are a standout from the bunch, as are most of the management companies based in Hong Kong. Nonetheless, these are the exceptions that prove the rule.

Here are the signs that you may want to start hunting for new offices. “Red Alerts” are signs that it is time to get out now.

10. Advertising everywhere. Ads start showing up on almost every surface: lobby displays, floor stickers, elevator displays, video ads, ads in the toilets, and on the windows of the ground floor. Don’t get me wrong, a little targeted advertising in the right place doesn’t hurt, but when the decor becomes Madison Avenue Modern, it’s gone overboard. Red alert: when they start putting advertising on the handles of the doors into tenant offices.

9. Tragic Carpet. Stained or damaged carpet tiles stay stained or damaged for a long time. Only the most egregious stains (usually involving a very light or very dark substance spread over a large area) get taken care of promptly. Red alert: carpets are removed altogether, replaced with concrete or faux-stone tile floors.

8. Crass Cieling. Drop-down ceilings need constant upkeep. When they start showing stains, get broken, or go missing, your building has begun its long, slow slide into slumlord territory. Red alert: drop down ceilings are removed completely, leaving not an attractive “industrial” look, but just ugly pipes and ducts.

7. Security? What Security? The well-dressed, friendly, security folks sitting at the front counter and checking for appropriate badges or patrolling the floors have been replaced by surly gatekeepers who act like everyone entering the building is a terror suspect. Red alert: they stop checking ID completely, with “surly” exchanged for “not even paying attention.” Eventually even the pretense disappears, and security staff are let go.

6. Cleanliness is left for Tawdriness. Those friendly ayis constantly patrolling the public areas of the building start showing up once a week, if that. You have to start reminding the management to clean the windows. Door handles are sticky, and numbers on the elevator panel are impossible to read. Red alert: stairwells have a layer of dust so thick you could slip on it, and the doors stick.

5. Smoking in the Boys’ Room. Men’s toilets smell like cigarette smoke. Constantly. Red alert: you catch a goldbricking building employee smoking in a toilet stall. Double red alert: women’s toilets smell like cigarette smoke.

4. Cigarette Bloat. The reek of cigarette smoke starts pouring out of offices as well as bathrooms, and “no smoking” signs begin to disappear from public areas and elevators. Red Alert: building employees smoking while working.

3. Don’t Cry for Me, Cappuccino. Starbucks moves out, replaced by some poor-imitation no-name coffee or snack shop with crappy food and overpriced drinks, and probably run by the building manager’s sister-in-law. Red alert: the no-name coffee shop closes and the shell of the store just sits there, forlorn and gathering dust.

2. Vertical Transportation Gets the Shaft. It starts feeling like the elevators are offline a lot more than they used to be, and at least one is either shut down or under  maintenance on a weekly basis. Red Alert: an elevator breaks down with you, a colleague, or a loved one in it and you are stuck for more than an hour.

1. Anchors (run) Away. The building’s prestige, or “anchor” tenants, usually multinational companies, start to depart, finding other places to set up, and replaced by more, smaller tenants. Red alert: the building’s directory is at least a year out of date, or has been removed completely.

thenakedlistener

In case anyone thinks the issues in this post are more or less confined to PRC, I like to add a rider that Hong Kong is in a comparatively and relatively same boat. The difference between the PRC and Hong Kong is only a matter of degree, though most will say Hong Kong operates much better (which it does, of course). I’ll put myself to the hazard and say this. Though not all Chinese-run companies are cut from the same cloth, many sadly are cut using the same tape measure. Most in my experience are not particularly pay little attention to the general upkeep of their premises and properties because those are not strictly in the ambit of resellability in the Chinese mind, which, sadly, is exactly the opposite.