China’s Hidden Health Crises

Hutong Forward
Contemplating Anacostia
1940 hrs

I have done a lot of work over the past several years with companies in different parts of the healthcare industry, each seeking a way into the China market. Almost every first meeting entails the client bringing up China’s current Five-Year Plan, and trying to figure out how to capture opportunities around the nation’s healthcare priorities as laid out in the plan.

Unfortunately, everyone does that, so the result is that the entire industry is chasing the same set of opportunities. In healthcare, that’s shortsighted. The best opportunities lie outside the stated government priorities, in part because the field is less crowded, and in part because those are usually the problems that the government finds most embarrassing and is anxious to address quietly.

An example is the scourge that diabetes has become in China. Before Johns Hopkins and the China Center for Disease Control and Prevention released their report last week, few had an idea of how large diabetes had become in a relatively short period of time. China now has 114 million diabetics, a third of the world’s total and representing 11.4% of the adult population – a higher rate than the US (11.3%). What is more, Chinese are developing diabetes at a lower body mass index than the US, so the rate of growth of the disease is not likely to abate soon.

China’s problem with diabetes: medications and treatment are more expensive than the average patient can afford. The obvious opportunity, then, a less expensive treatment regimen aimed at China’s massive population.

The upshot is this: global healthcare firms are going to find their best success not in chasing the obvious opportunities with remedies created for developed markets, but in addressing the health challenges that remain largely hidden from public view, and doing so with drugs and regimens that fit China’s local conditions.

China Medical News (@chinamedicine)

Easier said than done. With diabetes, for example, low cost and highly effective treatments such as metformin are already widely available for peanuts in China. Western companies can’t compete with the massive Chinese pharma industry on price, only on innovative products – for which there is little patent protection in China

David Wolf

Indeed. Which brings up a set of larger questions: if western pharmaceutical companies cannot compete on price, and they cannot compete on the basis of brown bags full of cash delivered to doctors, is China really a market for western pharmaceuticals? Is it more of a latent threat to the entire global pharmaceutical market? Or is there a way for Big Pharma to compete in China?