Nokia Problem #342: We Ignored Journalists

In the Hutong
Watching the tourists shuffle through the Forbidden City
1055 hrs. 

Working on a long paper about China and the demise of Nokia, I came across this interesting little anecdote from a journalist friend from 2011.

“So if you want to leak something, especially since you’re such a big fan of NOK, you can let the world know that a certain journalist found out today that despite having submitted questions for an interview in late July, was informed today, 17 days after the initial deadline, and 10 days after an extended deadline, that the interview would not be available.”

Nokia did not melt down because of the way it handled its media relations. Nonetheless, I contend that the problems that led to the end of Nokia were visible in a hundred facets of the organization long before the high flying handset maker found itself a rump division of a rudderless software company.

Harland

Nokia died because their CEO was a Manchurian Candidate who ran them into the ground on the behalf of Microsoft. In fact, being a dick to journalists can be quite a cathartic experience, seeing how many of them are only out to write negative stories. It seems editors aren’t interested in hearing that things are going well.